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July 19, 2018

BIW, Round Pond firm to pay $447K in EPA settlements

Courtesy / Bath Iron Works
Courtesy / Bath Iron Works
An aerial view of Bath Iron Works' shipyard on the Kennebec River in Bath. On Wednesday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reported that BIW agreed to pay $355,000 to resolve allegations by the federal agency that the company did not report handling of chromium, copper, manganese and nickel as required by the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act. EPA also reported that Masters Machine Co. of Round Pond will pay a $92,210 penalty to settle EPA complaints.

Two Maine companies must pay nearly $500,000 in civil penalties to settle federal complaints that they failed to file required reports about their use of toxic chemicals.

Bath Iron Works agreed to pay $355,000 to resolve allegations by the Environmental Protection Agency that the company did not report handling of chromium, copper, manganese and nickel as required by the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act, according to an EPA news release.

The complaint addressed the Bath shipbuilder's use of the chemicals from 2013 to 2015. In addition, the settlement covers EPA claims that BIW did not fully comply with its permit for stormwater discharge, violating the Clean Water Act.

The EPA also reported that Masters Machine Co. of Round Pond will pay a $92,210 penalty to settle EPA complaints that it did not submit the required reports for its use of copper during 2013-2015, and for the use of lead in 2014. Masters is a manufacturer of precision aerospace, automotive and electrical components.

The allegations were made as a result of EPA inspections, the agency said in its news release. Both companies subsequently filed the reports and have improved their compliance and BIW is also now in compliance with its stormwater permit, the release said.

The permit requires the company to minimize the exposure of its manufacturing waste, such as metal shavings and sand-blasting grit, so that when it rains these pollutants do not flow into the Kennebec River.

Atlantic Footcare, a Rhode Island manufacturer of shoe insoles, and Massachusetts gun-maker Smith & Wesson also agreed to pay a total of $108,000 to settle EPA complaints that they failed to file the chemical reports, according to the release.

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